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Photojournalist reminds us why kids shouldn’t cook the turkey

Poynter Top Stories - do, 20/11/2014 - 18:20

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s Mike De Sisti had a good, and funny, reminder for us on Wednesday — don’t let your children cook the turkey at Thanksgiving.

In a video feature, De Sisti, a photojournalist and multimedia picture editor for the Journal Sentinel, asked a group of first graders how to cook a turkey. They are darling and clueless.

“You cook a turkey for five minutes.”
“The temperature is about 20 degrees and…”
“Feathers don’t taste good.”

In 2011, De Sisti made a similar video asking kids questions about Christmas, and in 2012, he talked to kids about cooking turkey. To him, it feels like a feature he has just done, “but people don’t really remember.”

De Sisti spoke with the same group of first graders for an upcoming video about Christmas, which should run the day after Thanksgiving.

“We stuck to Santa.”

Correction: Mike De Sisti’s last name was misspelled in an earlier version of this story. Read more

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Tip: Remember this advice for news curation

Journalism.co.uk - do, 20/11/2014 - 18:16
Steve Buttry, former digital transformation editor at Digital First Media, shares advice on aggregating stories from the web
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Innovation day at CUNY with Shane Smith and Bill Gross

Jeff Jarvis BuzzMachine - do, 20/11/2014 - 18:11


We have a few seats available for a great event on innovation and news at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism on Monday Dec. 1, starting at 230p and running through a reception ending at 730p:

* We will give Vice founder Shane Smith the Knight Innovation Award.
* Bill Gross, founder of Idealab and more than 125 companies, will deliver a keynote about how he innovates and invents, with lessons for us in media.
* A panel including former gubernatorial candidate Zephyr Teachout; Betaworks data genius Gilad Lotan; Milena Berry of PowerToFly; and angel investor Alicia Syrett– all from outside media — will explore the challenges and opportunities of media.
* Smith will also award a give-forward grant to a journalistic startup of his choice.
* I will present my new book, Geeks Bearing Gifts: Imagining New Futures for News — and give away copies.
All that plus wine, beer, and discussion.

Details here. Register here.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Asia - Call for immediate release of journalist who goes on trial tomorrow

Reporters Without Borders - do, 20/11/2014 - 18:03

Gao Yu, a well-known journalist who was formally arrested on 8 May, is to go on trial tomorrow in Beijing on a charge of divulging state secrets to persons outside the country. Reporters Without Borders calls on the authorities to cancel the trial and release her at once.

After going missing on 23 April, Gao Yu reappeared on 8 May when CCTV News showed her making a forced confession in front of cameras. In a press release the next day, Reporters Without Borders condemned the pressure used to make her give a televised confession.

As the Communist Party controls the judicial apparatus, Gao will be subjected to a rigged trial with a predetermined outcome,” Benjamin Ismaïl, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Asia-Pacific desk said.

The party is trying to punish all those who denounce its dictatorial nature. It is not surprising that a regime that regards democracy and human rights as ideas that threaten its legitimacy should be trying to silence independent opinions and hopes of free speech and freedom of information. The trial must be stopped and Gao must be freed without delay.

Gao is accused of passing official documents to the German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle, to which she was a regular contributor. The authorities have not said what documents, just that they have solid proof.

It could be an internal party document called “Document No. 9”, which warns against “western concepts” that pose a danger because they have been exported with the aim of destabilizing the Chinese government.

Gao already spent seven years in prison in connection with her political writing and, if convicted this time, she could be facing a possible 15-year jail sentence.

The winner of many awards, including the UNESCO/Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize in 1997, Gao disappeared in April while on her way to an event commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy demonstrations. Her arrest marked the start of a crackdown on dissidents in the run-up of the 25th anniversary of the June 1989 massacre.

In China, a national department for the protection of state secrets is responsible for classifying sensitive information. However, its lack of transparency and the vague way it defines “classified information” give the authorities a free hand to charge journalists and bloggers with divulging “state secrets.”

The department announced in 2005 that it had withdrawn information about natural disasters from the lists of classified information. But that did not prevent the authorities from arresting many journalists and bloggers in connection with their coverage of the Sichuan earthquake in 2008.

They included blogger and human rights activist Huang Qi, who was sentenced to three years in prison for “possession of state secrets.”

China is ranked 175th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Asia - Call for immediate release of journalist who goes on trial tomorrow

Reporters Without Borders - do, 20/11/2014 - 18:03

Gao Yu, a well-known journalist who was formally arrested on 8 May, is to go on trial tomorrow in Beijing on a charge of divulging state secrets to persons outside the country. Reporters Without Borders calls on the authorities to cancel the trial and release her at once.

After going missing on 23 April, Gao Yu reappeared on 8 May when CCTV News showed her making a forced confession in front of cameras. In a press release the next day, Reporters Without Borders condemned the pressure used to make her give a televised confession.

As the Communist Party controls the judicial apparatus, Gao will be subjected to a rigged trial with a predetermined outcome,” Benjamin Ismaïl, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Asia-Pacific desk said.

The party is trying to punish all those who denounce its dictatorial nature. It is not surprising that a regime that regards democracy and human rights as ideas that threaten its legitimacy should be trying to silence independent opinions and hopes of free speech and freedom of information. The trial must be stopped and Gao must be freed without delay.

Gao is accused of passing official documents to the German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle, to which she was a regular contributor. The authorities have not said what documents, just that they have solid proof.

It could be an internal party document called “Document No. 9”, which warns against “western concepts” that pose a danger because they have been exported with the aim of destabilizing the Chinese government.

Gao already spent seven years in prison in connection with her political writing and, if convicted this time, she could be facing a possible 15-year jail sentence.

The winner of many awards, including the UNESCO/Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize in 1997, Gao disappeared in April while on her way to an event commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy demonstrations. Her arrest marked the start of a crackdown on dissidents in the run-up of the 25th anniversary of the June 1989 massacre.

In China, a national department for the protection of state secrets is responsible for classifying sensitive information. However, its lack of transparency and the vague way it defines “classified information” give the authorities a free hand to charge journalists and bloggers with divulging “state secrets.”

The department announced in 2005 that it had withdrawn information about natural disasters from the lists of classified information. But that did not prevent the authorities from arresting many journalists and bloggers in connection with their coverage of the Sichuan earthquake in 2008.

They included blogger and human rights activist Huang Qi, who was sentenced to three years in prison for “possession of state secrets.”

China is ranked 175th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

'Couldn't be reached' — a blog for all the times officials refuse to comment

Public Integrity - do, 20/11/2014 - 17:19

“The official did not return request for comment.”

“The agency declined to comment for this story.”

“They did not respond to several emails and phone calls requesting comment.”

No matter the wording, each of these statements means the same thing: we don't want to publicly answer questions.

Lately — whether it’s an investigative, nonprofit newsroom like us, an international outlet like the New York Times, or newer media like Politico or BuzzFeed — when journalists call, officials are choosing to comment less for stories on the record.

Media Relations Specialist William Gray and Engagement Editor Sarah Whitmire wanted to shine a light on just how often this happens and decided a new blog was the perfect platform.

Welcome to Couldn’t be reached.

It will focus on the institutions and people in power — both private and public — who refuse to comment on the record on stories in the public interest. It will be nonpartisan and apply the same high standards to its postings at the Center applies to its investigative reporting.

On Twitter, we’re launching with our own handle @DidNotComment and using the hashtag #nocommentclub.

For newsrooms and journalists, that will be the best way to share your story. You’re already tweeting about what you’re writing and producing; send us one, too.  

For readers, you can tweet us or submit directly on the blog.

We welcome your comments and submissions.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Einde voor Accountancynieuws

Villamedia Nieuws - do, 20/11/2014 - 17:09
Uitgeverij Kluwer trekt de stekker uit Accountancynieuws. Het tijdschrift, de website en het e-zine over de accountancy zullen na 19 december verdwijnen. De titel wordt stopgezet om bedrijfseconomische redenen. De twee congressen die aan het blad verbonden…
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

NPR: Can the holiday clichés

Poynter Top Stories - do, 20/11/2014 - 17:08

NPR

A note from NPR standards editor Mark Memmot throws a cup of cold wassail over holiday-season clichés. A selection of his phrases to avoid:

– “Tis the season to …” No, it tisn’t.

– “Oh, the weather outside is …” Don’t put that song in my head!

– “It’s beginning to look a lot like …” Not that one either!

Perhaps to head off criticism, Memmot also advises against comparisons to the Grinch.

Read more
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Nitasha Tiku joins The Verge

Poynter Top Stories - do, 20/11/2014 - 16:34

Business Insider

The Verge has hired Valleywag editor Nitasha Tiku to be its West Coast senior editor, Business Insider’s Alyson Shontell writes.

Tiku recently took over as sole editor of Gawker Media’s tech publication after Sam Biddle departed for Gawker.

Tiku will work alongside Casey Newton, who was recently appointed The Verge’s Silicon Valley editor.

Verge Editor-in-Chief Nilay Patel told Poynter he wanted its West Coast operation to be more than a “trade publication,” citing competitors like Re/code and TechCrunch. Instead, he said, he wanted to examine “the culture and the companies” of Silicon Valley.

Read more
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

It’s time to apply for a Nieman Fellowship

I’m not one for ranking life experiences like sports teams, but here’s something you hear a lot from Nieman Fellow alumni: “It was the best year of my life.” If that prospect appeals and you have thoughts about how a year at Harvard University could strengthen you and journalism, you’re reading the right story.

For more than 75 years, the Nieman Foundation has brought fellows to Cambridge for a year of study and exploration that has seeded some of the most remarkable journalism of the century. Our fellows have come from nearly 100 different countries and every medium, all of them searching for knowledge and challenges that would advance their work. Our alumni now range from Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer Robert Caro to Pulitzer Prize-winning legal columnist Anthony Lewis; from pioneering newspaper editors Robert Maynard and Geneva Overholser to new media creators Hong Qu of Upworthy and YouTube and Laura Amico of Homicide Watch; from Nigeria’s courageous Sunday Dare to I. Roberto Eisenmann Jr., co-founder of Panama’s crusading La Prensa; from Ecuadorian photographer Pablo Corral Vega to American cartoonist Doug Marlette.

There is no prototypical Nieman fellow, as is clear from the bios of our current class. The 24 — half Americans, half international — have a remarkably diverse industry pedigree. Their work has taken them to The Wall Street Journal and Boing Boing, the Los Angeles Times and the New Haven Independent, NPR and Cuba’s blogosphere, an online investigative startup in Serbia and The Washington Post, a Kentucky public radio station and CNN. Some fellows are at the nascent stages of their careers, others are senior newsroom leaders. They have in common a passion for journalism and have brought to Harvard an exciting set of questions they are exploring individually and as a class. And, yes, a mere three months into their work, some have already declared it the best year of their lives.

We now start the process that will lead us to next year’s class of fellows. That begins with the applications, and the deadlines are nigh:

  • International Nieman candidates need to submit their applications by December 1, 2014.
  • December 1 is also the deadline for applicants for the Nieman-Berkman fellowship.
  • If you are an American citizen applying for a Nieman, January 31, 2015 is your deadline.

The Nieman Foundation website has lots of information about how to apply along with the online application, and more background about our types of fellowships, including the Nieman-Berkman Fellowship in Journalism Innovation. For those who want to know more about what a fellow does at Harvard, the program at a glance is very helpful. If you still have questions about the program or the application requirements, our fellowship administrator John Breen is patient and smart and happy to help.

Over the coming months, we will choose a group of finalists and all of them will be interviewed. Joining me for those interviews will be an evolving group of Nieman and Berkman Center colleagues along with others from the Harvard and journalism communities. Last year that group included Harvard Business School professor Rohit Deshpande, and Nieman Fellow alumni Jane Spencer, digital editor-in-chief of Fusion, and David Skok, digital adviser at The Boston Globe.

My own Nieman year was transformative and prepared me for a journalistic future I had not yet opened my eyes to. To now help others realize the previously unimagined is the joy and promise of every new class, including the one we choose next. I look forward to reading your applications.

Ann Marie Lipinski is curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

U.S. spouses of ousted immigrants await Obama plan

Public Integrity - do, 20/11/2014 - 15:59

As she mulls over whether President Barack Obama’s immigration plan could possibly help her, U.S. citizen Nicole Salgado cannot help but feel intense frustration. 

She is exasperated with repeatedly explaining to members of Congress that it was Congress that approved a 1996 law making it impossible for her to legalize her undocumented husband of 10 years — even though she’s an American citizen who grew up near Syracuse, New York.

Salgado is also fed up with explaining why she, not by choice, was forced to move to Mexico eight years ago to live with her spouse Margarito Resendiz, a construction worker she met in San Mateo County, California. 

He was forced to leave the U.S. and serve out a mandatory 10-year minimum “bar” on living in the U.S. That’s a punishment he faced after the couple tried to do the “right thing” and come forward to seek legal status for Resendiz based on his marriage to Salgado.

The move to Mexico has exhausted the couple’s savings and derailed dreams. And it’s left them struggling to eke out enough of a living in Mexico to raise the couple’s now 4-year-old daughter, who is also a U.S. citizen. At 36, Salgado has patched together gigs teaching English. But she's been unable to make consistent use of her Cornell University education and her master's degree in teaching science from California's San Jose State University. 

“Living down here in exile,” she said, “I have lost a lot of faith in our U.S. system.”

Salgado is one of hundreds of thousands of Americans married to undocumented people who have moved abroad to stay with their spouses, suffered through separation from them, or live in constant fear that their spouses will be discovered and deported. 

These families are wondering if they’ll benefit from Obama’s executive action to temporarily legalize illegal immigrants with close ties to Americans.

Obama is expected to announce plans in broad strokes on Thursday night in a speech. The expectation is that he will spare certain illegal immigrants with U.S.-born children or U.S. spouses from deportation, as media have reported.

But the fine details of the plan will be of utmost importance, especially to people like Salgado, whose husband is already outside the country after voluntarily leaving to serve his bar. He cannot get a visa to return unless reforms to the law are made or Obama uses his power to provide a humanitarian path for his return.

Other foreign spouses have been deported after their marriages, and now have records that could also complicate their return. 

As the Center for Public Integrity and KQED Radio reported in 2012, some of these couples were torn apart after they discovered that Congress had created obscure but harsh penalties specifically to punish undocumented people who seek green cards after marriage — no matter if those marriages are legitimate and couples already have children together.

Couples have been shocked to discover that the undocumented spouse must first comply with a minimum 10-year bar before trying to get permanent residency, or a “green card.” Some foreign spouses have been slapped with 20-year bars or lifetime bars if they have a deportation in their history or were accused of falsely claiming to be a legal resident at some point.

In Resendiz’s case, because he had a prior deportation before marrying, he faced a permanent bar with an option to request a pardon — no guarantees — after 10 years. The application alone for the pardon will likely cost a total of at least $10,000 between filing fees and lawyer’s costs. That’s $10,000 that Salgado doesn’t have now and doesn’t think she will have in the near future. 

In August, Salgado posted a letter she sent to Obama imploring him to be sure to take into consideration the plight of American citizens like her if he presses forward with executive action. 

Salgado expressed concern about a backlash from Congress in reaction to any executive action. But she said she and other Americans are suffering from separation or exile — or the anxiety of their spouses being deported— and they need relief from the stalemate over immigration reform in Washington.

“Be as creative as possible,” Salgado wrote to Obama, “and use the full extent of your powers to take the lead in finding a way to include my family — my husband — and hundreds of thousands of our American families in that vision, and in any executive action you take on immigration, so we do not have to make the decision between family and country anymore.”

Salgado co-wrote a book about her experiences called Amor and Exile and launched a campaign to deliver it to members of Congress in 2013. She also belongs to a network called American Families United, which has been lobbying Congress and attempting to push forward bills to modify a complex web of penalties and give immigration officials more latitude to exempt couples.

In the Center and KQED’s investigation, “Separated by Law,” Americans told stories of their family life shattered and their lives impoverished by penalties that were suggested to Congress as a way to deter illegal immigration through example. There is no evidence that the penalties have had any impact on dissuading people from illegal immigration.

As the Center reported, Los Angeles resident Chris Xitco thought he could still legalize his wife simply just taking her down to a federal immigration center and signing her up and paying a fine. To his dismay, she was given a 10-year bar during an interview that had be conducted in Juarez, Mexico, at a U.S. consulate. The couple had received no prior warning this could happen and they had a new baby. Xitco’s wife, Delia, is still living south of Tijuana, Mexico, in a gated house where Xitco fears for the family's safety and visits on weekends.

San Diego resident T.J. Barbour, a software engineer, found out about the bars after he married and decided against filing for his wife Mayte’s green card. But she ended up stopped by a police officer for driving too slowly and was held in detention for six months while the couple tried to obtain asylum for Mayte. Immigration agents dumped Mayte in Tijuana after she lost her case without even a warning phone call to Barbour. The couple’s son was 9 at the time and has suffered losing his mother’s care.

North Carolina native Anita Mann moved to a remote area of Mexico with three small children so they could join her husband, who is still under a 10-year bar. Others who moved to Mexico, including Margo Bruemmer of New Jersey, told the Center and members of Congress about threats they and their children faced in some rural areas where they were living, including extortion and kidnapping.They implored members of Congress to reform laws to allow them to bring their spouses back.

In February 2013, during a visit to Congress, Bruemmer spoke at a press conference, saying: “I am begging for our lawmakers, in this upcoming immigration reform debate, to not forget those of us already living outside the country, already barred. Please, do not forget us.”

A Philadelphia member of American Families United, who is married with three children, said she’s worried about being left out if the Obama action does not include her husband. If she tried to legalize him, she said, the 1996 congressional mandates would require he receive a lifetime bar because he was accused of attempting to use a fake ID card years ago.

Every day, the woman, who asked for anonymity said, she worries that her husband could be detected and deported.

The professional woman said she hopes undocumented friends she has come know who have U.S. citizen children will benefit from the executive action. But she can’t bear the thought of her husband being left out of any relief because of his history long ago. “As a citizen, it’s like a twilight zone. I don’t even have words to express it,” she said.

In March 2013, Obama took a measured step for these couples by making it easier for some to apply to receive a special hardship waiver allowing the foreign spouse to return. Congress’ 1996 law does allow U.S. citizens to request such a waiver if citizens can prove they have a devastating medical condition or hardship beyond the normal suffering a spouse might experience due to separation from a mate.

Obama’s 2013 change allows couples to file for the hardship waiver before the foreign spouse leaves the country to begin serving out a bar. But the option is off limits to people who have deportations in their past or records like the Philadelphia woman’s husband. 

Kim Anderson, president of American Families United, said her group has tried to press the White House recently to provide measures that would help their members, such as “humanitarian parole,” which could allow citizens to bring back spouses even if only on a provisional basis. The group continues to hope Congress will amend the penalties it created in 1996.

“I’ve been astounded over the years at the assumptions that you marry a U.S. citizen and get a green card. It couldn’t be further from the truth,” said Anderson, whose own marriage was crushed by the despair over separation. “You should not have to be forced between your life and your country.”

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

How AAP is shaping an open source newsroom system

Journalism.co.uk - do, 20/11/2014 - 15:40
Australian Associated Press teamed up with software developer Sourcefabric to create a newsroom management system fit for the digital age
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Building Superdesk: How AAP is shaping open source newsroom system

Journalism.co.uk - do, 20/11/2014 - 15:40
Australian Associated Press teamed up with software developer Sourcefabric to create a newsroom management system fit for the digital age
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Here’s some remarkable new data on the power of chat apps like WhatsApp for sharing news stories

How news sites think about social platforms changes with time.

Five or six years ago, it wasn’t uncommon to see the bottom of a blog post chicken-pocked with a gazillion tiny icons representing social networks familiar and seemingly imaginary. More recently, as Facebook and Twitter have grown, you’ve seen a lot of sites trim that spot down to just those two.

RELATED ARTICLEAround the world, media outlets and journalists are using chat apps to spread the newsJune 10, 2014A couple years ago, the leading candidate to join those two would have been Google+, and it still shows up in a lot of places. But the real new contender is the new generation of chat apps, most prominently the acquired-by-Facebook-for-$19-billion WhatsApp. Their primary mode is one-to-one sharing as opposed to Twitter and Facebook’s one-to-many. But they’re such a large and growing part of people’s lives on mobile devices that they demand attention.

There’s one thing news outlets have been missing in evaluating apps like WhatsApp: good analytics. There’s not an easy way to tell if that visit to your website a moment ago came from a chat app, because it doesn’t leave a referer. It’s the very definition of dark social. And without numbers, it’s hard to know how much to optimize for WhatsApp traffic. Recode reported back in February that BuzzFeed seemed to be seeing terrific WhatsApp sharing action, but the data was still rough:

“Every time we looked at WhatsApp’s numbers, it blew us away,” said BuzzFeed president Jon Steinberg. “We knew last April this was a huge social network and have become increasingly obsessed with it.”

BuzzFeed integrated WhatsApp’s share button on iOS in October, and has seen shares double in the last few months, said BuzzFeed VP of business development Ashley McCollum.

But the WhatsApp tool is still very basic. “We only have click data, not referral data,” McCollum said. “So we know if you clicked the share button in mobile Web, but we don’t know (yet) if you shared in on a group text with 15 people and 15 people clicked it or if you shared it with one person.”

RELATED ARTICLENo, people are not already sharing more BuzzFeed stories to WhatsApp than to TwitterFebruary 20, 2014In other words, a lot of people were tapping the button, but there wasn’t a good way to tell whether that was turning into substantial traffic.

A social corner kick

That’s why I’m pleased to be able to share with you some actual hard data that looks at both the sharing piece and the traffic piece. It’s from an unusual source: the Spanish soccer club Valencia, currently sitting in third place in La Liga behind more internationally famous clubs Real Madrid and Barcelona.

Valencia, like most sports teams, has its own website where it publishes news stories about the team. And on the mobile version of its news stories, it includes four sharing buttons: Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and WhatsApp. It captures both click data (how many times each of those buttons was tapped) and, crucially, traffic data, by adding a URL parameter that helps them tell which service the reader is coming from.

So armed, Valencia is able to tell what platforms are most important for sharing. Here’s what it found. (This data comes from Daniel Ayers, who works for the sports-focused digital consultancy Seven League and has been serving as Valencia’s acting head of digital.)

What share of users’ clicks or taps did each of the four sharing buttons get? Facebook 35%, WhatsApp 33%, Twitter 19%, and Google+ 13%.

That’s a remarkably good showing for WhatsApp — even more remarkable when you realize that the WhatsApp button doesn’t even appear on desktops or laptops, only on mobile devices. (Technically it appears in any web browser no more than 740 pixels wide, which basically means smartphones.) So what happens if you only look at mobile shares?

You get this: Facebook 25%, WhatsApp 48%, Twitter 15%, and Google+ 11%.

WhatsApp gets nearly half of the sharing taps on mobile.

But what about traffic? Did those taps turn into lots of visits? Let’s go back to the larger dataset, mobile and desktop/laptop combined. What share of the visits did taps on each of those buttons produce? Facebook 27%, WhatsApp 48%, Twitter 22%, Google+ 3%.

In other words, WhatsApp has an even higher share of referers (48%) than it did taps (33%).

And what if we just look at mobile again? This is what you get: Facebook 15%, WhatsApp 69%, Twitter 16%, and Google+ zilch.

That’s crazy. Of those four sharing buttons on mobile, WhatsApp is generating more than two-thirds of the visits for Valencia.

Two yellow cards

Now, before you go make your news site one giant green WhatsApp button, there are two very important caveats to this data.

The first is national context. User behavior in Spain may not match user behavior in your country. As of earlier this year, 65 percent of Spain’s mobile Internet users were using WhatsApp; the equivalent number in the United States was just 8 percent.

(A sampling of other countries: France 6 percent, Australia 15 percent, Canada 16 percent, U.K. 36 percent, Germany 57 percent, Brazil 59 percent, Mexico 64 percent.)

In other countries, particularly in Asia, other chat apps (Kakao Talk, Line, WeChat) dominate the market. And chat apps haven’t taken off here in the U.S. to the degree they have in the rest of the world, where carrier (SMS) and smartphone-specific (iMessage, BBM) platforms are more popular.

But nonetheless, whether it’s WhatsApp or something else, it’s likely this generation of platforms will keep growing.

The second caveat is when stories blow up big — when they go viral. You may have noticed that in the charts above, the titles say they exclude a “spike story.” That’s because during the period Valencia was examining the data, they had one story really break out: this announcement that the club would subsidize tickets for its supporters who wanted to attend an away match at crosstown rival Levante. As you might imagine, the story blew up, earning more than 1,800 tweets and 12,000 Facebook likes, shares, and comments.

The charts above ignore that story, since it was such an outlier. But if you include it in the data, you get a different picture:

Facebook and Twitter suddenly look a lot more powerful, even on mobile. Why? It’s that gap between one-to-one/few and one-to-many. Most tweets don’t go anywhere — but when one blows up, it can blow up big. As open platforms built around following and friending, Facebook and Twitter enable big stories to get much bigger than private, individual-focused WhatsApp can.

As Valencia’s Ayers put it to me in a couple emails:

In short, WhatsApp outperforms Facebook, Twitter, and G+ for total referrals under “regular” content conditions, i.e. non-viral, non-spike stories. It results in almost 2 referrals per share, compared to 1 or less for the others.

When you do have a big spike article, WhatsApp still performs well for volume of shares, but the greater reach potential of FB and Twitter is activated — those channels start to generate 10 referrals for every share…

I think that for a site with a traffic profile which is heavily skewed towards spike/viral stories (BuzzFeed, or major news publishers), then the overall impact of referrals from WhatsApp will be less, because more of the potential reach of Twitter and Facebook will actually be realised. But, most club/brand sites will have a similar profile to valenciacf.com.

The aggregate score

So what should a news site take away from this data?

First, if you’re in a country with high WhatsApp use, you should probably add a little green button to the Facebook/Twitter shades of blue already on your mobile news stories. Spot checking a few major news sites in those countries, it’s remarkable how few have them. Particularly for your users on iPhones, WhatsApp isn’t as seamlessly integrated into the OS as Facebook and Twitter are, so the button could lead to a real shift in behavior.

Second, start gathering data. Put a parameter on your WhatsApp URLs and see what kind of action they generate.

Third, if you’re in a country where a different chat app is dominant, as in Asia, a button might generate a good return for the pixel investment.

And fourth, if you’re in the United States, none of these apps may be big enough yet to justify the design attention — but they’re headed in that direction. And their users are disproportionately young and on mobile devices — markets news organizations are chasing. Do some A/B testing and run your own data, but this might be a trend worth getting ahead of.

Photo of iPhone homescreen by Jan Persiel used under a Creative Commons license.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Career Beat: Anthony DeMaio named publisher of Slate

Poynter Top Stories - do, 20/11/2014 - 15:00

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Anthony DeMaio is now publisher of Slate. Previously, he was president of national sales there. (Politico)
  • Chelsea Janes will cover the Washington Nationals for The Washington Post. She covers high school sports there. (Washington Post)
  • Sophia Papaioannou is now editorial director at HuffPost Greece. She hosts “360 Degrees”. Nikos Agouros is now editor-in-chief of HuffPost Greece. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of VimaMen. (Huffington Post)
  • Steve Unger will be interim CEO at Ofcom. He is director of strategy, international technology and economy there. (The Guardian)

The Associated Press is looking for a supervisory correspondent in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Read more
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Here are some resources for Transgender Day of Remembrance

Poynter Top Stories - do, 20/11/2014 - 14:58

Protesters gather for a rally at the University of the Philippines campus at suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, to demand justice in the killing of Jennifer Laude on Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

When Jennifer Laude was murdered in October, a U.S. Marine was charged in her death. Many media outlets fumbled as they covered the story, seeming confused about how to refer to the young Filipina, who was transgender. Bloomberg BusinessWeek identified her as “a 26-year-old man who identifies as a woman.”  CNN, The Associated Press and Fox News, among others, published her birth name. Many news outlets paid special attention to the fact that Laude was transgender, and chose to call her death a “transgender death” or “transgender murder.”

November 20 is the Transgender Day of Remembrance, a day when activists and supporters take time to remember the transgender victims of homicide of that year. Read more

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Washington Post looks toward national audience with Kindle Fire app

Poynter Top Stories - do, 20/11/2014 - 14:52

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Washington Post looks toward national audience with new Kindle Fire app

    This is important: It will not provide local news. Updates every day at 5 a.m. and 5 p.m. Free for six months, a buck for the next six months. (WP) | Post people said owner Jeff Bezos "had made it clear, through meetings with executives and through feedback on ideas and proposals, that The Post’s broad strategy should shift toward growing its national and international audience — in direct contrast to its previous mission of narrowing its focus to local news." (NYT) | The Post also launched "BrandConnect Perspective" Thursday, a native advertising initiative for opinion pieces. First up is Bayer, with "Modern Agriculture is Based on Sound Science." (WP) | Related: Former Post Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli's North Base Media is an investor in Inkl, a "Spotify for media content." (StartupSmart)

  2. Bill Cosby and the media

    "I think if you want to consider yourself to be serious, it will not appear anywhere," he warns Brett Zongker after declining to comment on rape allegations.

Read more
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

‘De democratie is niet geëindigd op 25 mei’

Apache.be - do, 20/11/2014 - 14:46
Hoe gezond is onze democratie? Dat vroeg stRaten-generaal zich gisteren af naar aanleiding van haar vijftienjarig bestaan. Het antwoord viel bepaald niet mee. 'Plenaire zittingen en commissievergaderingen in het parlement zijn archaïsch. Dat leidt tot sclerose', vindt politicologe Karen Celis.
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Push for Parity: ‘This isn’t only about women.’

Poynter Top Stories - do, 20/11/2014 - 14:24

This essay is the fourth in our Push For Parity essay series, featuring stories about women in leadership in journalism. For more on our series and details about how you can contribute, see Kelly McBride’s essay introducing the project. Poynter and ONA have also announced a tuition-free women’s leadership academy.

When the Asian American Journalists Association hosted a panel on women leadership in August, the session had a lot going for it: A standing-room-only crowd, a theme very much on people’s minds, and an all-star lineup from broadcast, newspapers and magazines.

But it was missing one thing: Almost no men showed up, hardly any spoke up and the panelists were all women. Though a third of convention goers were male, the women in that particular session, “How to change the ratio from the top,” outnumbered the men 10 to one.

This spring, when the top editors of The New York Times and Le Monde were fired on exactly the same day in very public ways, it placed a spotlight on the shrinking number of top women editors. Read more

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Mail breaks monthly web traffic record for UK newspapers

Journalism.co.uk - do, 20/11/2014 - 14:02
Mail Online received 192 million unique monthly visitors in October, the highest among UK newspaper sites, but criticised for 'giving free publicity to quacks' over Ebola
Categorieën: Extern nieuws
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