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Lebanon - Special Tribunal for Lebanon puts journalist and TV station on trial

Reporters Without Borders - di, 21/04/2015 - 19:11

Reporters Without Borders reiterates its support for Lebanese TV journalist Karma Khayat, whose trial before the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) in The Hague on charges of contempt of court and obstructing justice began last week.

Created to investigate Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri's assassination in 2005, the STL accuses Karma Khayat and her Arabic-language TV news channel, Al Jadeed TV, of endangering supposed confidential witnesses by filming them for a report after learning of their identity from an anonymous leak.

The report, which Al Jadeed TV broadcast in instalments from 6 to 10 August 2012, has not been removed from the station's website or YouTube account. The charges were originally announced in April 2014.

This is the first time that a TV station has been the subject of a prosecution by an international court. The company that owns Al Jadeed TV, New TV S.A.L., is also being prosecuted. The STL is the first international court to be set up to investigate a single act of terrorism.

Now Al Jadeed TV's vice-president, Khayat says the report's aim was to draw attention to the STL's problems and did not endanger the supposed witnesses because their names and their faces were pixelated in the video footage. The STL accuses her of undermining the public's confidence in its ability to protect witnesses.

She is facing the possibility of a 7-year jail sentence and a 100,000-euro fine at the end of the trial, which began on 16 April.

Reporters Without Borders, which supports Khayat and her TV station, believes it is vital to preserve freely-reported news coverage in Lebanon at a moment in its history that is extremely delicate from both the political and security viewpoint.

We condemn the decision to try Al Jadeed TV and Karma Khayat, who are guilty solely of holding the STL to account by broadcasting information obtained from leaks,” Reporters Without Borders programme director Lucie Morillon said. “The media have a duty to question the way the courts operate and to encourage a public debate on this subject.”

International media that covered this story have not been charged. They include the Canadian broadcaster CBC, the German news magazine Der Spiegel and the French dailies Le Figaro and Libération, which used confidential documents and internal STL leaks.

Khayat told the judge on 16 April: “The International Court was created for us and with our money. It is our duty to monitor its work.” Her lawyer, Karim Khan, said Khayat and other Al Jadeed TV employees have received death threats in connection with the case.

According to our sources, the report's two main aims were to show that confidential information was being leaked from within the TSL, thereby endangering the proceedings, and to highlight the fact that is was easy to access “protected” witnesses, who had not been briefed about the confidential nature of their status as witnesses.

The first session of the trial, which began with the prosecution presenting its arguments, is due to end tomorrow. The trial will resume on 12 May, when the defence will have three days to present its witnesses and arguments. No date has been set for the verdict.

Members of a group that supports Khayat and Al Jadeed TV attended the start of the trial. They include Florence Hartmann, a French journalist who was convicted of contempt of court by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

The STL has also charged Ibrahim Al-Amine, the editor of the daily Al-Akhbar, and the company that owns his newspaper, with contempt of court and obstruction of justice. No date has so far been set for their trial.

Reporters Without Borders submitted an amicus brief on the Khayat case to the STL when a preliminary hearing was held on 13 May 2014.

Lebanon is ranked 98th out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Lebanon - Special Tribunal for Lebanon puts journalist and TV station on trial

Reporters Without Borders - di, 21/04/2015 - 19:11

Reporters Without Borders reiterates its support for Lebanese TV journalist Karma Khayat, whose trial before the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) in The Hague on charges of contempt of court and obstructing justice began last week.

Created to investigate Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri's assassination in 2005, the STL accuses Karma Khayat and her Arabic-language TV news channel, Al Jadeed TV, of endangering supposed confidential witnesses by filming them for a report after learning of their identity from an anonymous leak.

The report, which Al Jadeed TV broadcast in instalments from 6 to 10 August 2012, has not been removed from the station's website or YouTube account. The charges were originally announced in April 2014.

This is the first time that a TV station has been the subject of a prosecution by an international court. The company that owns Al Jadeed TV, New TV S.A.L., is also being prosecuted. The STL is the first international court to be set up to investigate a single act of terrorism.

Now Al Jadeed TV's vice-president, Khayat says the report's aim was to draw attention to the STL's problems and did not endanger the supposed witnesses because their names and their faces were pixelated in the video footage. The STL accuses her of undermining the public's confidence in its ability to protect witnesses.

She is facing the possibility of a 7-year jail sentence and a 100,000-euro fine at the end of the trial, which began on 16 April.

Reporters Without Borders, which supports Khayat and her TV station, believes it is vital to preserve freely-reported news coverage in Lebanon at a moment in its history that is extremely delicate from both the political and security viewpoint.

We condemn the decision to try Al Jadeed TV and Karma Khayat, who are guilty solely of holding the STL to account by broadcasting information obtained from leaks,” Reporters Without Borders programme director Lucie Morillon said. “The media have a duty to question the way the courts operate and to encourage a public debate on this subject.”

International media that covered this story have not been charged. They include the Canadian broadcaster CBC, the German news magazine Der Spiegel and the French dailies Le Figaro and Libération, which used confidential documents and internal STL leaks.

Khayat told the judge on 16 April: “The International Court was created for us and with our money. It is our duty to monitor its work.” Her lawyer, Karim Khan, said Khayat and other Al Jadeed TV employees have received death threats in connection with the case.

According to our sources, the report's two main aims were to show that confidential information was being leaked from within the TSL, thereby endangering the proceedings, and to highlight the fact that is was easy to access “protected” witnesses, who had not been briefed about the confidential nature of their status as witnesses.

The first session of the trial, which began with the prosecution presenting its arguments, is due to end tomorrow. The trial will resume on 12 May, when the defence will have three days to present its witnesses and arguments. No date has been set for the verdict.

Members of a group that supports Khayat and Al Jadeed TV attended the start of the trial. They include Florence Hartmann, a French journalist who was convicted of contempt of court by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

The STL has also charged Ibrahim Al-Amine, the editor of the daily Al-Akhbar, and the company that owns his newspaper, with contempt of court and obstruction of justice. No date has so far been set for their trial.

Reporters Without Borders submitted an amicus brief on the Khayat case to the STL when a preliminary hearing was held on 13 May 2014.

Lebanon is ranked 98th out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Hillman Prize Winners Announced

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 18:33

The Sidney Hillman Foundation has announced the winners of the 2015 Hillman Prizes, which honors socially-conscious reporting. Below is the full list. The winners will be celebrated at a ceremony and reception at The Times Center on May 5.

Book Journalism
Edward Baptist
\"The Half Has Never Been Told\"
Basic Books

Newspaper Journalism
Bob Ortega, Daniel Gonzalez, Michael Kiefer, Dan Nowicki, Erin Kelly, Mariana Dale
David Wallace, Michael Chow, Nick Oza, Stuart Warner, Cherrill Crosby
\"A Pipeline of Children\" and \"Revisiting the Pipeline\"
The Arizona Republic

Magazine Journalism
John Richardson
\"The Abortion Ministry of Dr. Willie Parker\"
Esquire

Web Journalism
Joan Biskupic, Janet Roberts, John Shiffman
\"The Echo Chamber\"
Reuters

Broadcast Journalism
Phil Williams, Bryan Staples, Kevin Wisniewski
\"Policing for Profit\"
WTVF-TV NewsChannel 5

Opinion & Analysis Journalism
Jelani Cobb
The New Yorker

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Cruising World Will Take Your Back-of-the-Napkin Pitch

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 18:30

There are still places left in the world where the Internet is spotty at best, and a magazine for people who spend their days in those spaces. Nope, not survivalists — sailors. Sailing mag Cruising World’s audience comes from the same population as its writers. Its pages are filled with first-person accounts of sailing trips from writers who often file from the tiny, remote islands where they’ve anchored.

And editor in chief Mark Pillsbury will take the stories any way he can get them, from SailMail, which uses radio or satellite to transmit email, to traditional USPS deliveries.

“People can write stuff on the back of a napkin, and we’ll take a look at it,” said Pillsbury. “

However you send your pitches or submissions, make sure these elements are in place:

“We’re all sailors and we all love reading good stories,” said Pillsbury. “There’s no real recipe, but when you read a really good sailing story you know it. There’s a surprise there, there’s a challenge there.”

Writers are required to submit high-resolution photos with their fully written submissions. In addition to SailMail submissions, the mag receives CDs of work via good-old snail mail.

For more, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Cruising World

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Condé Nast International’s First Luxury Conference is SRO

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 18:00

The opening cocktail party is tonight, in Florence, Italy. Followed by two days of panel discussions, interviews and presentations at the Palazzo Vecchio, many of them chaired by international Vogue editor Suzy Menkes (pictured). Welcome to the first-ever Condé Nast International Luxury Conference.

A highlight of Day One (April 22) at this sold-right-out event is sure to be the chat between Menkes and Karl Lagerfeld. And on Day Two (April 22), as part of a series of grouped presentations titled “My Florence,” there is this:

Ermanno Scervino, Founder, Ermanno Scervino

In this session, Ermanno Scervino will share what Florence, the city of dreams, culture and imagination, means to him and to his work.

When Condé Nast International chairman and CEO Jonathan Newhouse first tipped the event last fall, he suggested that “through magazines and websites like Vogue, Vanity Fair and GQ, Condé Nast is the luxury industry’s leading media partner. The Condé Nast International Luxury Conference will animate our brands in a new way, bringing together top luxury players in a stimulating event to provoke new thinking, forge connections and make things happen.”


 
[Photo via: cniluxury.com]

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Of Course Don Lemon Pronounces ‘Sorbet’ Wrong

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 17:44

Oh, Don Lemon. In a GQ profile of CNN’s genius anchor, you can’t even make it through the first few paragraphs before finding something new that makes Lemon look like a moron. Lemon, of course, wrongly thinks sorbet is pronounced “sorbette.” He even corrects the author (and mediabistro alum) Taffy Brodesser-Akner, when she pronounces it the right way.

The GQ profile does nothing to alter the perception that Lemon has plenty to say and it’s almost always wrong. CNN president Jeff Zucker doesn’t go out of his way to deny this, either.

“Let me put it this way,” Zucker told GQ, “There’s certainly a lot of interest in Don Lemon, and that’s a good thing for Don and for CNN. You know, Don is a little bit of a lightning rod. Frankly, we needed a little bit of lightning.”

Huh. We always thought “a little bit of lightning” is already way too much.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Newsonomics: The Wall Street Journal is playing a game of digital catchup

RELATED ARTICLEAfter the launch of its long-awaited web redesign, The Wall Street Journal hopes to spur innovationApril 21, 2015Don’t just call it a redesign. The Wall Street Journal, like Bloomberg before it a couple of months ago, wants you think about more than appearance, which “redesign” implies for many. You might call the new Journal a multi-platform rejiggering. Importantly, it represents the first major, uh, redesign of the Journal’s digital products since way back in September 2008. As the Journal’s chief innovation officer Edward Roussel points out, in that prehistoric world, mobile accounted for only 10 percent of all usage. The world has indeed changed; unsurprisingly, “mobile” is top of mind as the Journal finishes a long process of rebuilding its digital presences.

In the background, much else is moving at the Journal. Engineers and designers are moving into the newsroom soon to work in teams and as partners with traditional newsies. The Journal is upgrading its analytics functions, bringing those into the newsroom and into wider business usage. It’s buying into agile development.

RELATED ARTICLEThe newsonomics of momentum in the WSJ/NYT battleJanuary 10, 2014If the substance and spirit of these changes sound familiar, they should. The Journal’s peers at FT, The New York Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, and others plying the national/global news trade have all made broadly similar moves within the past couple of years. The new Journal, under Dow Jones CEO Will Lewis, editor Gerry Baker, and Roussel, are plainly playing catchup. Given News Corp’s deep pockets, that catchup doesn’t place them in any financial peril, but it does highlight, once again, how much the two-year tenure of deposed Dow Jones CEO Lex Fenwick cost. With its global brand, the Journal shot out of the gate in the early iPhone and iPad era, distinguishing itself with innovative products, some of which worked, and some of which didn’t. (Parent News Corp’s The Daily ran high with its tablet-embracing iPad product, a source of good, early innovation ideas, most of which died on the vine.) Many of those responsible for leading the creation of those products have moved on to other companies, including new Fortune editor Alan Murray, who is now reshaping that magazine to compete more directly with his longtime employer, on tech (including the recent hiring of half-dozen former Gigaom staffers) and in other business sectors.

Any major change in digital products requires a major rethinking. We can pick apart the look, feel, and function of the new WSJ product — it’s lighter and more visual, of course — and I’ll provide a quick take on that below. But most important here is the business and product strategy. What do the new products tell us about the way the Journal — still the largest paid-circulation daily in the U.S. — sees the world, its readers, and its advertisers at this point? We can distill that thinking into seven distinct points.

1. Home sweet home

Side-door traffic, driven by search and then social, has driven so much of the audience acquisition game for several years. Even so, the Journal finds that two-thirds of its paying subscribers visit its homepage at least monthly — and homepage usage is growing. That’s a hugely important audience, made up of 700,000 digital-only subscribers (compared to more than 900,000 for its competitor, The New York Times and 504,000 for the Financial Times) plus a good portion of its 1.5 million print readers who sign up for all-access. These readers, the Journal believes, come to the Journal for curation — the editors’ take on the day’s (or moment’s) top news. Given the Journal’s new responsive design, that editorial hierarchy now appears across devices, says Roussel: “Whatever Almar decides is the news is the news.” Almar is Almar Latour, the Journal’s executive editor. Until now, three different editors decided story priority on smartphone/tablet, desktop, and print. While that curatorial default makes some sense, certainly, the audience knowledge now coming in tells us that reading habits often differ markedly — for the same reader — across different platforms, so the Journal may well decide to tweak how it makes story-hierarchy decisions.

2. Housecleaning

Many of us who maneuver among the apps, mobile browsers, and desktop browsers of our go-to news sources find them confusing. A share button on the phone will be at the left bottom of the page, but at the top on the desktop — with the tablet offering its own non-intuitive way of moving around a page. The Journal redesign begins to tackle those issues. In reviewing a six-year-old set of products, the Journal found a digital mess. S one byword of this change is decluttering. The number of exposed navigation options has been more than cut in half on many pages.

3. Multidevice, singular experiences

With the redo, the Journal makes the strong point this is a new beginning — not an endpoint. Its new technology systems and platforms will allow it to innovate more quickly, helping with that catchup. Even with all the work put into the products launched today, much of what the Journal wants to do to meet the needs of cross-platform readers remains a work in progress.

Take the saving of stories, for instance, a hugely important function for digital subscriber-driven websites. Other sites have allowed readers to save stories on a phone and access them on the web, or vice versa. That functionality is a couple of months away, says Roussel. Similarly, the visual signal of graying out a headline to remind readers they’ve already read it needs to work across devices. Roussel agrees and says it’s on the list, but with no likely date of introduction.

The same is true for Watchlist, providing Journal readers the ability to create their own stock portfolios, a feature that dates back to the late ’90s. Roussel says cross-device ability to access a reader’s Watchlist is a future priority as well, but for now, readers will have to input their watched stocks separately (and redundantly) on each device. Friday’s launch of the Apple Watch only makes the need for — and consumer expectation of — cross-platform seamlessness more of a must-have.

4. Beware the ratios

Two years ago, the tablet looked like a match made in heaven for national newspaper companies. It offered bigger display than smartphones and more interactivity than the desktop — and you could take it with you. Tablets still drive 10 to 15 percent of digital traffic at news sites generally, and the same is true of the Journal. But it has seen 10 percent year-over-year growth rate in tablet visitors vs. 30 to 40 percent among smartphone visitors. “The top of the funnel [allowing new readers to discover the Journal through search or social] is the smartphone,” says Roussel.

Similarly, minding both the mobile browser experience and the app experience is key. App users are power users. They drive four times more pageviews on average than do browser users. They spend twice as much as time as browser users. Apps users appear to be less likely to drop their subscriptions than others. Consequently, the Journal — like all high-end publishers, and unlike most regional news companies — saw the need to put resources into both kinds of mobile products. While that’s more expensive, it’s a necessity, with apps broadly satisfying loyal subscribers and the mobile browser the greatest source of new customers ever invented.

5. There’s still that desk

Desktop minutes are clearly shrinking as a share of overall digital minutes for all news providers, with numerous ones telling me their numbers are trending slightly down year over year. At the Journal, though, its specific use case is quite different. After all, many heavy readers spend their days in desk-bound workplaces, in front of that still unmovable desktop. So that desktop experience still makes up 56 percent of all Journal usage, about five points higher than many other news companies. For the Journal, that meant redesign decisions acknowledging that continued primacy for many, even as it also focused on mobile development. For instance, data shows that Journal subscribers start their days both on smartphones and desktops, while non-subscribers overwhelming favor mobile.

6. Mind both revenue streams

The rapid adoption of the smartphone offers a problem for many ad-dependent publishers. Mobile ads offer fetch the lowest ad rates. For the Journal, Times, FT, and peers, though, the smartphone’s strongest revenue source is subscribers, though that may be an indirect one. “Our number one goal [for the smartphone] is subscription,” says Roussel. The new products improve display for the three ad products Roussel identifies as top ones: 1) iPad interstitials; 2) web-based video and 3) native ads. A key new feature: the ability to have an ad float down page, off to the side of content, as readers scroll down the page, increase the viewability of the ad.

7. Maintain the metaphor

From its iPad inception, the Journal’s app has defaulted to a digital edition of that morning’s paper. All the content is the same as the paper, though videos can be added. It seems like a retro product in an age where the Journal has moved its newsroom profoundly 24/7. Surprisingly, the redesign still defaults. Why? 80 percent of Journal iPad users use that digital edition each month, leading Roussel to believe that the continued default still makes sense in 2015. The new iPad look does, however, make it easier to switch between digital edition and live.

The new Journal, at first look, is a good improvement. It fits into today’s news presentation trends. Its organization is more straightforward (though, oddly, a good module of editor’s picks is found at the bottom of some pages). No surprise: While it’s brighter than its predecessor, it’s still far more staid and less spirited than the recently relaunched Bloomberg.com (“Bloomberg’s Justin Smith Sees a Window in Shakeup of Digital Reader Habits”). It does seem to load more quickly, a major goal since the old site lagged competitors on this important metric. Markets data is much better presented and better integrated with text stories. These improvements may just seem commonsensical 25 years after the birth of the browser, but they should better differentiate the Journal from the general news competition and bring it back to its main utility for readers — as the nation’s business daily.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Wired Debuts ‘Next List’

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 17:21

Wired’s May issue features the magazine’s inaugural “Next List,” which honors mostly unknown people who are likely about to shakeup the business world.

“Any one of their stories is inspirational, whether it’s Jeff Dean’s neural nets (we got clearance to reveal them), Megan Smith’s plan to upgrade the US government’s technology, Yael Maguire’s broadband-dispensing drones, or Tracy Chou’s powerful tool for bringing more diversity to the technology industry,” wrote Wired editor Scott Dadich, in his monthly note to readers. “But together, this eclectic group points toward a new way of thinking about new ways of thinking.”

Below are some of those who made the cut.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

After the launch of its long-awaited web redesign, The Wall Street Journal hopes to spur innovation

Edward Roussel said it wouldn’t be an exaggeration to call this past year “the busiest 12-month period in The Wall Street Journal’s history” as the Journal has built out WSJD, redesigned fresh responsive article and video pages, and released new iPad and Android apps. That continues this week with the long awaited redesign of The Wall Street Journal’s website, its first since 2008, which launched today, and the release on Friday of the Journal’s app on the Apple Watch.

But beyond new apps and redesigned websites, the Journal is integrating its product team into the newsroom and Dow Jones, the Journal’s parent, has created an innovation group, led by Roussel, who now has the title of Dow Jones’ chief innovation officer. “Until a year or so ago, the cadence wasn’t swift enough, and that’s what we’re seeking to put right,” he said. Processes that took months last year when the Journal was creating the first responsive part of its site, WSJD, now take weeks to accomplish, he said.

The Journal’s product team will become part of the newsroom and designers will also sit among other editorial staffers. Through the recent redesign processes, the Journal has introduced an agile approach that emphasizes quick development cycles. The paper hopes that by moving the staffs together and onto one larger team it can reduce friction and encourage collaboration, Journal executive editor Almar Latour said.

“We think that this moment is really probably as significant, if not more so, than when our digital team moved into what was then the print newsroom,” Latour said. “Right now, this is a new milestone for us. The editors themselves, the editors for web and mobile will play a leading role in shaping and creating future product.”

The Journal is only the latest of a number of newspapers who have taken steps to better integrate their newsrooms and development teams. By the end of the year there, for example, there will be 47 engineers working in The Washington Post newsroom, Post editor Marty Baron said in a speech he gave earlier this month.

The innovation group, led by Roussel, meanwhile is looking at how the Journal will operate “12, 24 months out in this rapidly transitioning, mobile-led era and think about the products and services that we should be delivering and then start working on them now,” he said.

Roussel added that Dow Jones is interested in what role it can play in the venture capital sector, while also focusing on working with the team in the Journal newsroom and elsewhere in the company to continue areas of new development. “It’s really a dual goal, and at some point they join up,” he said. “How do we iterate faster and innovate faster day to day, while also giving ourselves the capacity to look further down the line?”

He said they plan to look at ways to better personalize push alerts to make them more relevant to readers, Roussel said. Another area of focus will be live video on mobile, he said.

The Journal, like many news organizations, is looking to boost its mobile metabolism as an ever larger percentage of its readership is reading the Journal on mobile. When The Wall Street Journal last redesigned its website in 2008, about 10 percent of its traffic came from mobile. Today, that’s at 44 percent, Roussel said.

The Journal still wants to keep desktop users in mind — many subscribers come to the site during the day while they’re at their desks. (Cutting against the industry trend, the Journal’s homepage traffic actually increased last year, he said.) Still, mobile is an area of focus. Next month, the Journal plans to release updates to its iPhone and iPad apps that are aimed at increasing their speed and performance; the iPhone app will also get a visual refresh.

On its Apple Watch app — scheduled to be released Friday when the first watches become available — the Journal is emphasizing the gestural nature of the device. If you’re looking at a headline on the watch and then tilt it in a certain way, the story will then be available in the Journal’s iPhone app. The app will feature top stories and market data. Users will be able to save stories to their iPhone with a tap or open up more of the story on the watch.

“A lot of what our team has looked at is the interactions between the iPhone and the watch, so that’s one body of work,” Roussel said. “The second one is how to keep it really simple.”

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

DRC - Radio journalist's throat cut in DRC

Reporters Without Borders - di, 21/04/2015 - 16:41

Reporters Without Borders is appalled by radio journalist Soleil Balanga's brutal murder in Monkoto, in the northern province of Equateur. Balanga's throat was cut by an assailant as he was returning home on 16 April from Monkoto community radio, where he worked.

According to Radio Okapi, he was attacked by the son of Monkoto general hospital's supervisor because he broadcast a report referring to the appointment of a new doctor to replace the alleged assaillant's father. The police have arrested the reported killer.

“We condemn this shocking murder and call on the police and justice system to conduct a proper investigation and punish those responsible,” said Cléa Kahn-Sriber, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Africa desk.

Crimes of violence against journalists are rarely the subject of proper investigations and judicial proceedings in Democratic Republic of Congo. A total of 60 journalists were beaten or threatened in 2013-2014, in some cases by the police, without any investigation aimed at identifying their assailants. The murders of Serge Maheshe, Didace Namujimbo and several others remain to be solved. This impunity encourages more violence against media personnel.

DRC is ranked 150th out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Report: The Top Ten Most Censored Countries

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 16:24

The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) has released a report detailing the 10 worst countries for censorship. Eritrea and North Korea are ranked number one and two, respectively, with Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia and Azerbaijan rounding out the top five.

“In Eritrea, President Isaias Afewerki has succeeded in his campaign to crush independent journalism, creating a media climate so oppressive that even reporters for state-run news outlets live in constant fear of arrest,” explained the CPJ report. “The threat of imprisonment has led many journalists to choose exile rather than risk arrest. Eritrea is Africa’s worst jailer of journalists, with at least 23 behind bars-none of whom has been tried in court or even charged with a crime.”

The rest of the top 10 most censored countries—in order—include Vietnam, Iran, China, Myanmar and Cuba.

Congrats, America! You aren’t top 10 bad. As for top 20…

(Image: Shutterstock)

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

VIDEO: Surveillance and the ‘1984 Generation’

Online Journalism Blog - di, 21/04/2015 - 16:11

Online video project newsPeeks have put together a documentary on surveillance. I really enjoyed it, so I’m sharing it here. Not only is the content great (newsPeeks were live at the Logan Symposium on the topic late last year so got some great contacts), but the production is a great example of online-native video (disclosure: I’m an unpaid advisor).

In addition to the video above you can watch a couple more that the team produced earlier this year on whistleblowing, hacking, and NSA surveillance specifically embedded below.


Filed under: online journalism, online video, video Tagged: hacking, newsPeeks, NSA, surveillance, video, whistleblowing
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Pulitzer-winnaar uit journalistiek

Villamedia Nieuws - di, 21/04/2015 - 15:51
In de Verenigde Staten zijn opnieuw de Pulitzers, de prestigieuze journalistieke jaarprijzen, uitgereikt aan een reeks van off- en online media en enkele individuele journalisten, zoals freelance fotojournalist…
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

WSJ Launches Revamped Site

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 15:35

The Wall Street Journal finally gave its website a makeover. The new WSJ.com is brighter—gone is the odd tan coloring of the old site—cleaner, and features responsive design, so it looks the same no matter what platform you’re using.

Navigation is also improved on the revamped WSJ.com; it’s now much easier to move from section to section. That’s really something that can be said about the site overall — it is simply more fluid. Landing pages and article pages have more white space. Everything is modernized, from customization tools to images. It’s a much better reading experience.

The old WSJ.com felt needlessly complicated. The new WSJ.com feels just right.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Sean Bratches to Leave ESPN After 27 Years

10000 words - di, 21/04/2015 - 15:20

ESPN veteran Sean Bratches is leaving the company at the end of 2015. Bratches has been with the sports empire since 1988, when he joined as an account executive in affiliate marketing.

“We all have greatly appreciated—and benefited from—Sean’s energy, integrity and service to ESPN, our employees and our industry,” wrote ESPN president John Skipper, in a memo to staffers. “I personally have tremendous respect and admiration for what Sean has accomplished, and I am happy to report that he will serve the company in an advisory capacity through the end of the year.”

Bractches most recently served as executive VP, sales and marketing. He has held that role since 2005.

Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Redactie Telegraaf oneens met directie

Villamedia Nieuws - di, 21/04/2015 - 14:15
UPDATE De redactie van De Telegraaf verzet zich massaal tegen het plan van de directie om subtitels van de krant te verzelfstandigen. De plannen voor een opsplitsing van de titel in verschillende deelredacties, werd…
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

België zet oude krantenpagina’s online

Villamedia Nieuws - di, 21/04/2015 - 14:12
De Koninklijke Bibliotheek van België zet ruim een miljoen pagina’s uit historische kranten online, meldt deredactie.be. De pagina’s zijn een geavanceerde…
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

Can newsrooms be ethical and competitive with UGC?

Journalism.co.uk - di, 21/04/2015 - 13:36
An expert panel discussed the issues at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia
Categorieën: Extern nieuws

De perfecte belasting

Apache.be - di, 21/04/2015 - 12:48
Een van de meer mysterieuze Britse gebruiken voor ons, toen wij er vele jaren geleden als Belgische expats aanbelandden, was het voorzien van je auto van een zogenaamde “private plate” – een gepersonaliseerde nummerplaat. In België kreeg je toen immers de plaat die de dienst je toewees, en daarmee afgelopen. Maar hier voerden de zondagskranten
Categorieën: Extern nieuws
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